Saturday, December 29, 2018

Absorbing Lusitania Mystery An Engaging Gem

(Image from Barnes & Noble)

2013—Sarah Blake knows she's never supposed to open the trunk that belonged to her great-grandfather, an Irish steward who died when the RMS Lusitania sunk in 1915.  Unfortunately for her integrity, the writer is desperate for the money it takes to keep her mother in a reputable care home, which means she needs to publish a new book.  And fast.  Frantically searching for a unique subject, she turns to the trunk.  What she finds inside could lead to an explosive, best-selling story, not to mention a rewriting of history.

1915—Caroline Telfair Hochstetter, a Southern belle, can't quite figure out what her husband's up to.  His actions have become increasingly suspicious of late, putting a strain in their new marriage.  Hoping to reconnect while enjoying lavish accommodations on Lusitania, Caroline's dismayed to find a tempting old flame on board.  What secret is her husband keeping?  Could it—or a rekindling of old feelings—end her floundering marriage?  

1915—Tennessee Schaff can blend in anywhere.  That's what makes her so good at the long con, including her specialty—forging valuable art.  Tired of the dishonesty, Tennessee wants out.  Her partner promises to free her after they make their fortune on one last scam while aboard Lusitania.  The last thing the forger needs is a distraction like Robert Langdon, especially when she starts to realize this con is much more than it seems ...

As Sarah digs into the lives of her ancestor and the people he associated with on Lusitania, she makes some startling discoveries.  With the help of an arresting Englishman, she'll find her story and much, much more.

The Glass Ocean by Beatriz Williams, Karen White, and Lauren Willig is an absorbing novel featuring fascinating historical details, a cast of intriguing characters, and an engrossing, twisty plot.  I loved learning about Lusitania, a doomed ship I knew little about.  That, plus the novel's other appealing characteristics makes The Glass Ocean a thoroughly engaging read that I very much enjoyed.  While I've read many books by White, I've never read anything by the other two authors—now, I very much want to.  The W's make for a winning combination of writers and I hope they continue to collaborate.  If you love historical fiction, definitely check this one out.


Grade:


If this were a movie, it would be rated:


for language (a couple of F-bombs, plus milder expletives), violence, and mild sexual content

To the FTC, with love:  I bought a copy of The Glass Ocean at Barnes & Noble with a portion of the millions I make from my lucrative career as a book blogger.  Ha ha.

1 comment:

  1. I've been watching the hold list on this one as well. I think it might be coming around soon. Love the sound of it. And I've read one book by Lauren Willig - her Pink Carnation book - female spies.

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