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2021 Literary Escapes Challenge

- Alabama
- Alaska
- Arizona (1)
- Arkansas
- California (4)
- Colorado (1)
- Connecticut (1)
- Delaware
- Florida
- Georgia
- Hawaii (1)
- Idaho
- Illinois (4)
- Indiana
- Iowa
- Kansas
- Kentucky (1)
- Louisiana (1)
- Maine
- Maryland (1)
- Massachusetts (1)
- Michigan (1)
- Minnesota (1)
- Mississippi
- Missouri
- Montana
- Nebraska (1)
- Nevada (1)
- New Hampshire (1)
- New Jersey (1)
- New Mexico
- New York (4)
- North Carolina (1)
- North Dakota
- Ohio (6)
- Oklahoma
- Oregon
- Pennsylvania (1)
- Rhode Island (1)
- South Carolina (1)
- South Dakota
- Tennessee
- Texas (1)
- Utah (1)
- Vermont (2)
- Virginia (3)
- Washington (3)
- West Virginia
- Wisconsin
- Wyoming (1)
- *Washington, D.C.

International:
Australia (2)
Canada (3)
England (6)
France (1)
Ireland (1)
Switzerland (1)
The Philippines (1)
Wales (1)

My Progress:


28 / 51 states. 55% done!

2021 Fall Into Reading Challenge

My Progress:


0 / 24 books. 0% done!

2021 Children's Historical Fiction Reading Challenge

2021 Children's Historical Fiction Reading Challenge
(Hosted by Yours Truly!)

My Progress:


6 / 25 books. 24% done!

2021 Popsugar Reading Challenge

My Progress:


33 / 50 books. 66% done!

Booklist Queen's 2021 Reading Challenge

My Progress:


35 / 52 books. 67% done!

2021 Historical Fiction Reading Challenge

2021 Craving for Cozies Reading Challenge

The 52 Club's 2021 Reading Challenge

My Progress:


39 / 52 books. 75% done!
Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Top Ten Tuesday: The Books That Started It All


Ever feel like you use the same books over and over and over for your Top Ten Tuesday lists?  I do, which is why I'm super excited about this week's topic.  Before we get to that, though, I just want to encourage you to hop on board the TTT train.  It's a fun way to find new blogs to love, grow your own audience, and, of course, add more awesome books to your TBR pile mountain mountain chain.  What's not to love?  All you have to do is click on over to That Artsy Reader Girl, read a few instructions, make your own list, and start spreading the love around the book blogosphere.  It's a good time, I promise!

Today's topic is (First) Ten Books I Reviewed On My Blog.  Isn't that a fun prompt?  I started blogging waaayyyy back in August of 2006, so it was fun to see what I was reading back then and ponder how my reading tastes have changed and not changed over the 13 ensuing years.  Kick back, relax, and let's take a little stroll down the BBB memory lane ...

(First) Ten Books I Reviewed On My Blog:   


1.  The Peacegiver by James L. Ferrell (reviewed August 13, 2006):  My husband and I read this inspirational book at the same time and had some great discussions because of it.  The book uses a fictional frame story about a couple struggling to keep their marriage together to teach the reader about the Atonement of Jesus Christ.  Verdict:  According to the review I wrote of The Peacegiver, both my husband and I found this one enlightening, even though it was a little cheesy and not all that well-written. 


2.  The Known World by Edward P. Jones (reviewed August 14, 2006):  This Pulitzer Prize-winning novel is about a former slave who earns enough money to buy his own plantation, complete with a passel of slaves.  When he dies, his widow tries to keep everything running smoothly, but it's not long before the whole operation descends into chaos.  Verdict:  While I didn't love this one, it offered a unique view on slavery that I appreciated.   


3.  Break No Bones by Kathy Reichs (reviewed August 18, 2006):  I've long been a fan of Reich's Temperance Brennan series.  This is the 9th book starring the intrepid forensic anthropologist and while it wasn't my favorite of the bunch, I enjoyed it.  There are now 17 books in the series, although it has been stalled due to the author's ill health.  Verdict:  This is still one of my very favorite crime fiction series.


4.  The Memory Keeper's Daughter by Kim Edwards (reviewed September 1, 2006):  This bleak novel concerns a doctor who, because of a fierce snowstorm, is forced to deliver his own twins, one of whom has Down syndrome.  While his wife is still under heavy anesthesia, the man gives the child to his nurse, imploring her to take the baby to an institution.  The nurse can't bear to leave the infant; instead, she leaves town and raises the girl on her own without telling the doctor.  The story is about the consequences of the doctor's action and how it affects all involved parties.  Verdict:  I found this novel compelling and thought-provoking, but couldn't quite get over how depressing it was.  


5.  Peace Like a River by Leif Enger (reviewed September 13, 2006):  I loved this beautiful novel about family and faith.  It features a sibling pair who run off to the Badlands in hot pursuit of their outlaw older brother.  Verdict:  This novel left a deep impression on me.  I loved the characters, the writing, and the messages.  As much as I adored this book, I haven't read anything else by Enger.  Weird. 


6.  Cold Sassy Tree by Olive Ann Burns (reviewed October 15, 2006):  I've always loved Southern novels and this one is a classic.  It's about a huge scandal in a small town—a widower of only three weeks marries a Yankee and sets every tongue in town to wagging.  Verdict:  This novel is laugh-out-loud hilarious, but it also has moments of great poignancy.  I loved it.


7.  Two Little Girls in Blue by Mary Higgins Clark (reviewed November 2, 2006):  Clark has kept me entertained with clean, but compelling mysteries since I was a teenager.  Her newer books aren't nearly as good as her older ones, so I haven't read her much lately.  This book is about toddler twins who are kidnapped.  Verdict:  Tame and predictable, but still a page-turner.


8.  The Ruins by Scott Smith (reviewed November 4, 2006):  I made the mistake of reading this creepy novel on Halloween night, which made me jump at every little sound!  It concerns a group of friends who venture into a Mexican jungle to check out some old ruins.  Mayhem ensues.  Verdict:  This is a super spooky page-turner, which I enjoyed in spite of an ending that just didn't satisfy.


9.  The Madonnas of Leningrad by Debra Dean (reviewed November 30, 2006):  This memorable historical novel features a Russian woman who finds herself trapped in the art museum where she works while war rages around her.  As she fights to survive, she also works to save precious masterpieces.  Verdict:  This is a beautifully written story with vivid details and a unique perspective on World War II.


10.  Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear (reviewed December 18, 2006):  I enjoyed this series opener about a former WWI nurse who opens a detective agency in 1929 in London.  Her first case has her following a woman suspected of having an extramarital affair.  Although the case seems pretty routine, Maisie soon discovers there's more going on than meets the eye.  Much more.  Verdict:  This is an intriguing start to a series that now has 15 installments.  It's got a little bit of everything—history, romance, adventure, and humor.  Although I enjoyed this first book, I haven't continued on with the series, something I need to remedy.

So there you have it—the first ten books I reviewed on my blog.  Have you read any of them?  What were the first ten you reviewed?  How have your reading tastes changed/not changed over the course of your book blogging career?  I'd truly love to know.  Leave a comment on this post and I will gladly return the favor.

Happy Top Ten Tuesday!
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Reading

<i>Reading</i>
The Gold in These Hills by Joanne Bischof

Listening

<i>Listening</i>
Glass Houses by Louise Penny



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