2021 Literary Escapes Challenge

- Alabama
- Alaska
- Arizona (1)
- Arkansas
- California (4)
- Colorado (1)
- Connecticut (1)
- Delaware
- Florida
- Georgia
- Hawaii
- Idaho
- Illinois (3)
- Indiana
- Iowa
- Kansas
- Kentucky
- Louisiana
- Maine
- Maryland (1)
- Massachusetts
- Michigan
- Minnesota (1)
- Mississippi
- Missouri
- Montana
- Nebraska (1)
- Nevada (1)
- New Hampshire (1)
- New Jersey
- New Mexico
- New York (3)
- North Carolina (1)
- North Dakota
- Ohio (5)
- Oklahoma
- Oregon
- Pennsylvania (1)
- Rhode Island (1)
- South Carolina (1)
- South Dakota
- Tennessee
- Texas
- Utah (1)
- Vermont (2)
- Virginia (3)
- Washington (1)
- West Virginia
- Wisconsin
- Wyoming (1)
- *Washington, D.C.

International:
Australia (2)
Canada (3)
England (5)
France (1)
Ireland (1)
Switzerland (1)
The Philippines (1)
Wales (1)

My Progress:


21 / 51 states. 41% done!

2021 Historical Fiction Reading Challenge

- About a war other than World War II
- Takes place before 1800
- Set in a country you do not live in Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
- Main character travels on a ship, train, or covered wagon Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
- Set in a decade you don't usually choose to read about
- A major holiday is celebrated
- Takes place in a city or region where you have lived The Island at the End of Everything by Kiran Millwood Hargrave
- Features time travel to the past
- About a historical disaster, natural or otherwise
- With a proper noun in the title Premeditated Myrtle by Elizabeth C. Bunce
- Features a real female hero from the past
- Book that relates somehow to your own family history (the main character emigrates from the same country your ancestors did, the MC participates in a historical event your family member did, about someone you're related to, etc.)
- Written by a BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) author
- Features a main character with a different ethnicity, religion, or culture than your own The Length of a String by Elissa Brent Weissman
- Has an animal on the cover
- A ghost story
- Features a castle or an old house
- Set in South or Central America
- A mystery The Lost Girl of Astor Street by Stephanie Morrill
- Set in the decade that one of your parents was born in
- Concerns an event of historical significance that happened during your lifetime (or your parents' lifetimes if you were born after 2000)
- Features a search for gold or other kinds of treasure
- A person in period clothing on the cover
- Based on a true story
- A main character who is Native American, Alaska Native, or Native Hawaiian

My Progress:


6 / 25 books. 24% done!

2021 Popsugar Reading Challenge

- A book that's published in 2021 The Caretakers by Eliza Maxwell
- An Afrofuturist book
- A book that has a heart, diamond, club, or spade on the cover Dial A for Aunties by Jesse Q. Sutanto
- A book by an author who shares your zodiac sign The Nature of Fragile Things by Susan Meissner
- A dark academia book
- A book with a gem, mineral, or rock in the title Murder at Marble House by Alyssa Maxwell
- A book where the main character works at your current or dream job Along a Storied Trail by Ann H. Gabhart
- A book that has won the Women's Prize for Fiction
- A book with a family tree
- A bestseller from the 1990s
- A book about forgetting
- A book you have seen on someone's bookshelf (in real life, on a Zoom call, in a TV show, etc.) Home Before Dark by Riley Sager
- A locked-room mysteryThe Sanatorium by Sarah Pearse
- A book set in a restaurant Killer Kung Pao by Vivien Chien
- A book with a black-and-white cover Death in the Family by Tessa Wegert
- A book by an Indigenous author
- A book that has the same title as a song
- A book about a subject you are passionate about The Book of Lost Names by Kristin Harmel
- A book that discusses body positivity
- A book found on a Black Lives Matter reading list
- A genre hybrid The Elephant's Girl by Celesta Rimington
- A book set mostly or entirely outdoors Alone by Megan E. Freeman
- A book with something broken on the cover Strike Me Down by Mindy Mejia
- A book by a Muslim American author
- A book that was published anonymously
- A book with an oxymoron in the title Dark August by Katie Tallo
- A book about do-overs or fresh starts The Midnight Library by Matt Haig
- A magical realism book Beginners Welcome by Cindy Baldwin
- A book set in multiple countries In the Deep by Loreth Anne White
- A book set somewhere you'd like to visit in 2021 Toxic Toffee by Amanda Flower
- A book by a blogger, vlogger, YouTube video creator, or other online personality
- A book whose title starts with "Q," "X," or "Z"
- A book featuring three generations (grandparent, parent, child) Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
- A book about a social justice issue
- A book in a different format than what you normally read (audiobooks, ebooks, graphic novels) Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus by Dusti Bowling (audiobook)
- A book that has fewer than 1,000 reviews on Amazon or Goodreads The Length of a String by Elissa Brent Weissman
- A book you think your best friend would likeThe Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman
- A book about art or an artist Veiled in Smoke by Jocelyn Green
- A book everyone seems to have read but you A Lady's Guide to Mischief and Mayhem by Manda Collins
- Your favorite prompt from a past POPSUGAR Reading Challenge When the Stars Go Dark by Paula McLain

ADVANCED:

- The longest book (by pages) on your TBR list
- The shortest book (by pages) on your TBR list
- The book on your TBR list with the prettiest cover Shadows of the White City by Jocelyn Green
- The book on your TBR list with the ugliest cover On These Magic Shores by Yamile Saied Méndez
- The book that's been on your TBR list for the longest amount of time
- A book from your TBR list you meant to read last year but didn't Egg Drop Dead by Vivien Chien
- A book from your TBR list you associate with a favorite person, place, or thing The Answer Is...by Alex Trebek
- A book from your TBR list chosen at random The Island at the End of Everything by Kiran Millwood Hargrave
- A DNF book from your TBR list
- A free book from your TBR list (gifted, borrowed, library) The Lost Girl of Astor Street by Stephanie Morrill

Booklist Queen's 2021 Reading Challenge

1. A Productivity Book
2. Book Becoming Movie in 2021
3. Goodreads Winner in 2020 The Midnight Library by Matt Haig
4. Biography
5. About a Pressing Social Issue
6. A Book About Books To Kill a Mocking Girl by Harper Kincaid
7. Set in the 1920s The Lost Girl of Astor Street by Stephanie Morrill
8. An Author Who Uses Initials Anne of the Island by L.M. Montgomery
9. Poetry
10. A 2020 Bestseller Home Before Dark by Riley Sager
11. Recommended by a Colleague Death in the Family by Tessa Wegert
12. With a Number in the Title 96 Miles by J.L. Esplin
13. Bottom of Your To-Read List
14. Reread a Favorite Book Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
15. Own Voices Story On These Magic Shores by Yamile Saied Méndez
16. Published in the 1800s Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
17. Local Author Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus by Dusti Bowling
18. Longer Than 400 Pages Dark August by Katie Tallo
19. A Book Turned Into a TV Series The Cold Dish by Craig Johnson
20. A Book That Makes You Think The Lost Family by Libby Copeland
21. A WWII Story The Length of a String by Elissa Brent Weissman
22. A Highly Anticipated Book The Caretakers by Eliza Maxwell
23. Eye-Catching Cover The Island at the End of Everything by Kiran Millwood Hargrave
24. A Summer Read A Lady's Guide to Mischief and Mayhem by Manda Collins
25. Coming of Age Story Alone by Megan E. Freeman
26. Bestselling Memoir The Answer Is... by Alex Trebek
27. Book Club Favorite
28. A Book About Friendship Beginners Welcome by Cindy Baldwin
29. An Audiobook Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
30. Set in Australia In the Deep by Loreth Anne White
31. By a Nobel Prize winner
32. About an Immigrant The Nature of Fragile Things by Susan Meissner
33. Time Travel Novel
34. An Author You Love Egg Drop Dead by Vivien Chien
35. Childhood Favorite
36. Classic Read in High School
37. Borrowed from the Library Murder at Marble House by Alyssa Maxwell
38. Nonfiction New York Times Bestseller
39. From an Indie Publisher
40. Fantasy
41. A Sequel The Stills by Jess Montgomery
42. Recommended by a Librarian
43. Psychological Thriller The Missing One by Lucy Atkins
44. Oprah Winfrey Book Club Pick
45. A Book About Technology
46. Title with Three Words Strike Me Down by Mindy Mejia
47. Debut Novel of Famous Author
48. Genre You Don't Usually Read
49. A Book Everyone Is Talking About The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman
50. You Own But Haven't Read The Sanatorium by Sarah Pearse
51. Borrowed from a Friend
52. A 2021 New Release When the Stars Go Dark by Paula McLain

My Progress:


35 / 52 books. 67% done!

Books Read:

1. Murder at Marble House by Alyssa Maxwell (2 toe tags)
2. The Caretakers by Eliza Maxwell (11 toe tags, 1 unknown COD)
3. Egg Drop Dead by Vivien Chien (1 toe tag)
4. Strike Me Down by Mindy Mejia (3 toe tags)
5. The Lost Girl of Astor Street by Stephanie Morrill (4 toe tags)
6. When the Stars Go Dark by Paula McLain (8 toe tags)
7. Toxic Toffee by Amanda Flower (3 toe tags)
8. Dark August by Katie Tallo (14 toe tags)
9. The Stills by Jess Montgomery (7 toe tags)
10. The Nature of Fragile Things by Susan Meissner (6 toe tags)
11. To Kill a Mocking Girl by Harper Kincaid (2 toe tags)
12. A Lady's Guide to Mischief and Mayhem by Manda Collins (8 toe tags, 1 unknown COD)
13. Death in the Family by Tessa Wegert (9 toe tags)
14. Veiled in Smoke by Jocelyn Green (3 toe tags)
15. Home Before Dark by Riley Sager (6 toe tags)
16. In the Deep by Loreth Anne White (2 toe tags)
17. The Family by Louise Jensen (4 toe tags)
18. The Cold Dish by Craig Johnson (5 toe tags)
19. The Missing One by Lucy Atkins (5 toe tags)
20. The Postscript Murders by Elly Griffiths (4 toe tags, 1 unknown COD)
21. The Bone Code by Kathy Reichs (12 toe tags)
22. The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman (10 toe tags)
23. The Mountains Wild by Sarah Stewart Taylor (6 toe tags)
24. Dial A for Aunties by Jesse Q. Sutanto (1 toe tag)
25. The Dead Season by Tessa Wegert (1 toe tag)
26. A Trail of Lies by Kylie Logan (3 toe tags, 1 unknown COD)
27. After Alice Fell by Kim Taylor Blakemore (7 toe tags)
28. The Sanatorium by Sarah Pearse (6 toe tags, 2 unknown COD)
29. A Distant Grave by Sarah Stewart Taylor (10 toe tags)
30. The Stranger Behind You by Carol Goodman (8 toe tags)
31. Such a Quiet Place by Megan Miranda (3 toe tags)
32. Good Girl, Bad Blood by Holly Jackson (9 toe tags)
33. Premeditated Myrtle by Elizabeth C. Bunce (3 toe tags)
34. Killer Kung Pao by Vivien Chien (1 toe tag)

2021 Craving for Cozies Reading Challenge

Books Read:

1. Murder at Marble House by Alyssa Maxwell
2.
The Length of a String by Elissa Brent Weissman
3. The Lost Girl of Astor Street by Stephanie Morrill
4. The Island at the End of Everything by Kiran Millwood Hargrave
5. When the Stars Go Dark by Paula McLain
6. The Stills by Jess Montgomery
7. Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
8. The Nature of Fragile Things by Susan Meissner
9. A Lady's Guide to Mischief and Mayhem by Manda Collins
10. Veiled in Smoke by Jocelyn Green
11. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
12. Shadows of the White City by Jocelyn Green
13. The Family Ship by Sonja Yoerg
14. The Book of Lost Names by Kristin Harmel
15. Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
16. After Alice Fell by Kim Taylor Blakemore
17. Premeditated Myrtle by Elizabeth C. Bunce

Cozies Read:

1. Murder at Marble House by Alyssa Maxwell
2. Egg Drop Dead by Vivien Chien
3. Toxic Toffee by Amanda Flower
4. To Kill a Mocking Girl by Harper Kincaid
5. Killer Kung Pao by Vivien Chien

The 52 Club's 2021 Reading Challenge

1. Set in a school
2. Featuring the legal profession
3. A dual timeline
4. An author that is deceased
5. Published by Penguin When the Stars Go Dark by Paula McLain
6. A character with the same name as a male family member Toxic Toffee by Amanda Flower
7. An author with only 1 published book 96 Miles by J.L. Esplin
8. A book in the 900's of the Dewey Decimal System The Answer Is... by Alex Trebek
9. Set in a Mediterranean country The Book of Lost Names by Kristin Harmel
10. Related to the word "fire" Veiled in Smoke by Jocelyn Green
11. Book with discussion questions inside The Lost Girl of Astor Street by Stephanie Morrill
12. Title starting with the letter "D" Dark August by Katie Tallo
13. Includes an exotic animal The Missing One by Lucy Atkins
14. Written by an author over 65 (when published) The Bone Code by Kathy Reichs
15. A book mentioned in another book Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
16. Set before the 17th Century
17. A character "on the run" Egg Drop Dead by Vivien Chien
18. Author with a 9-letter last name The Postscript Murders by Elly Griffiths
19. Book with a deckled edge
20. Made into a TV series The Cold Dish by Craig Johnson
21. Book by Kristin Hannah
22. A family saga The Family Ship by Sonja Yoerg
23. An ending that surprises you Death in the Family by Tessa Wegert
24. A book you think they should read in schools
25. A book with multiple character POV Strike Me Down by Mindy Mejia
26. An author of color On These Magic Shores by Yamile Saied Méndez
27. First chapter ends on an odd page number To Kill a Mocking Girl by Harper Kincaid
28. Includes a historical event you know little about The Island at the End of Everything by Kiran Millwood Hargrave
29. Featuring the environment
30. Watch out for dragons!
31. Shares a similar title to another book A Lady's Guide to Mischief and Mayhem by Manda Collins
32. A selfish character Murder at Marble House by Alyssa Maxwell
33. Featuring adoption The Length of a String by Elissa Brent Weissman
34. A book you'd rate 5 stars The Lost Family by Libby Copeland
35. Set in a country that starts with the letter "S" The Sanatorium by Sarah Pearse
36. A nameless narrator
37. An educational read
38. Recommended on BookBub
39. An alternate history novel
40. Found via #bookstagram Home Before Dark by Riley Sager
41. An endorsement by a famous author on the cover
42. An epistolary
43. A character with a pet cat The Midnight Library by Matt Haig
44. Includes a garden Premeditated Myrtle by Elizabeth C. Bunce
45. A coming of age novel Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
46. Winner of the National Book Award - any year
47. A character with a disability Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus by Dusti Bowling
48. A cover with a woman who is facing away The Stills by Jess Montgomery
49. A flavour in the title
50. A shoe on the cover Alone by Megan E. Freeman
51. Published in 2021 The Caretakers by Eliza Maxwell
52. Re-do one of the previous 51 categories from this 2021 challenge The Nature of Fragile Things by Susan Meissner (#48 - Woman on Cover Facing Away)

My Progress:


32 / 52 books. 62% done!

Now Listening to:

Now Listening to:
The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend by Katarina Bivald

My Progress:


31 / 50 books. 62% done!

Thursday, September 11, 2008

Author Chat: An Interview with Beth Fehlbaum

Hi Beth. Welcome to Bloggin' 'bout Books! Let's talk about your book ...

Me: I think it's pretty obvious why you wrote Courage In Patience, but I guess I want to hear it in your own words - What inspired you to write this book?? ?

BF: In the course of my recovery from childhood sexual abuse, I wrote a lot of poems and short stories and shared them with my therapist. One day, he suggested that I try writing a novel. It took about four months to pull myself out of my own head enough to attempt writing about someone else's recovery. When I was able to do that, the story began to flow. I wrote it for myself, initially. It was only as I neared the ending that I began to think about seeking publication for it, because I realized that it could provide hope for others who were on the same path as I, and help people who love those who have been abused to understand what it is like to live in that world, in that dark place-- and to show them, too, that there is hope. It's found in truth.

Me: To me, your book felt more like a memoir than a novel. Why did you choose to tell your story through fiction?? How did this format help or hinder your ability to tell an authentic story?
BF: First of all, I suppose I need to clear up a misconception here. This is not my story. It is not an autobiography or a memoir. I must say I am flattered that it reads as if it is a memoir, because that tells me that I did well my job of bringing Ashley Nicole Asher to "life."

Me: In the book, you portray a variety of authority figures who react to Ash's allegations against her stepfather in different ways. Some are instantly supportive, others are skeptical, and still others are in flat-out denial. Why do you think some adults react so negatively to children's pleas for help? And, what do you think our responsibilities as parents, teachers, and administrators are in regards to the kids we have "authority" over?

BF: I believe that the choice that some adults make to ignore children's pleas for help is rooted in their unwillingness to face the truth when it's an ugly thing to see. In terms of parents, it is a parent's responsibility to love and protect his or her child. Period. Anything less is unacceptable.

With regard to teachers and administrators, the law is very clear in that a child's outcry for help must be reported to authorities.

Me: Like Ash's stepmother, you work with victims of sexual abuse through your job as an English teacher. In what ways can reading and writing help kids overcome the obstacles in their lives, whether they are experiencing abuse, racial slurs, problems with parents, etc?

I work with all kinds of kids in my capacity as a teacher, and the thing that all kids-- all people, for that matter-- need to know is that they are not alone in dealing with problems. Kids feel less isolated when they read stories which feature characters they can identify with. Writing is a wonderful way for all people to take what is in their heads and see it in black and white. Not only does it help one take a step back and be able to see what's going on in a less emotional way, but it's also a valid way of processing events. And, should they choose to do so, when kids share what is going on with them through writing, they are pretty much guaranteed that they will not be interrupted in their telling. Writing often feels safer than talking.

Me: The back cover of Courage In Patience states that it is "Suitable for classroom study" and contains "No graphic content." I'll be honest with you, I don't agree with this statement at all. If my child's teacher assigned it, I would have to seriously think about whether or not I would let my kid read it. I know you're anti-censorship, but do you really think your book is suitable for classroom reading? Why or why not? I know you believe in authenticity and truth-telling, but how much truth is too much truth for kids, especially those who have never experienced the kind of abuse you're talking about?

BF: This is a complicated issue with several considerations to be kept in mind. First, the age and maturity of the reader. I did not necessarily write Courage in Patience with a YA audience in mind, nor did I label it as "suitable for classroom reading" or as having "no graphic content." The publishing house made the decision to put those statements on the cover.

Some of the scenes in the book are painful to read, I know. That said, I believe that teenagers are much more capable of dealing with life's messiness when it's on the pages of a book, rather than within their day-to-day existence. A lot of kids, though, are not so lucky as to be blissfully unaware of abuse. At any rate, I would like to think that Courage in Patience will be the springboard to dialogue between adults and teenagers, particularly when these statistics are considered:

1 in 4 girls (25%) are sexually abused by the age of 18.

1 in 6 boys (17%) are sexually abused by the age of 18.

Most teen sexual abuse victims (7 in 10, or 70%) know their abuser. It is generally a family member, or someone close to the family.

Of female Americans who are raped, 54 percent of them experience this type of sexual abuse for the first time before they are 18.

A victim of one incident of teen sexual abuse is likely to experience further sexual abuse.

Teenagers account for 51% of all reported sexual abuse.

Teenagers between the ages of 16 and 19 are 3.5 times more likely than the general public to be victims of sexual abuse.

69% of the incidences of teen sexual abuse occur in a residence.

23% of all sexual offenders are under the age of 18.

Female victims of teen sexual abuse while in grades 9 through 12 are more likely than others to experience eating disorders, suicidal behavior, pregnancy and risky sexual behaviors.

(SOURCE: http://www.teenhelp.com/teen-abuse/sexual-abuse-stats.html)

As you can see, in a classroom of teenagers, roughly a quarter of them-- or more-- have experienced sexual abuse. I think it is important that these people know they are not alone. Courage in Patience is not, however, at its root, about sexual abuse. It is about finding freedom and healing through truth, and second chances when those things seemed out of the realm of possibility, among other things.

While I do understand what I am perceiving as your discomfort with some of the aspects of Courage in Patience, I am committed to truth-telling and authenticity. I believe teenagers are intelligent enough beings to make up their own minds about what they want to read, and I absolutely support parents having dialogue with their kids about what their kids are reading. You're right about my stance on censorship. I do not believe that books should be banned. While I respect parents' rights to, with their teenagers, decide which books fit into their families' value systems, I think it is wrong to dictate to others which ideas are suitable to consider on the pages of a book.

Me: I see that you're working on a sequel to Courage In Patience - tell me a little about that. What does life have in store for Ash Asher?

BF: Yes, I am at work on the sequel to Courage in Patience, titled Hope in Patience. Ashley is continuing to struggle to accept "what IS," with respect to her relationship with her mother and the challenges she faces as a result of her scars. Beyond that, it's still so early in the birthing process that I do not want to share more at this time.

Me: What kind of response have you gotten from readers of your book? Has it gotten the reaction you expected?

BF: The response to Courage in Patience has been overwhelmingly positive. I did not really have preconceived notions of what the reaction would be, although it was my goal that readers would recognize the love that Ashley is surrounded by in her father's family, and the healing that occurs. Everyone who has read it so far and contacted me has found Ashley to be a very lovable, empathetic character that they found themselves rooting for.

Me: What advice would you give to victims of sexual abuse, especially children and teens, who are struggling to deal with the trauma they have experienced? What have you learned from your own experience that can help kids cope with victimization??

BF: Any child or teen who has been victimized by someone else needs to know that what happened is not his or her fault. That's very important, because there is so much shame borne by the victim that really belongs to the abuser.

With respect to my own experiences, I would just say to anyone who has been abused, "There is hope. Don't give up. It's sometimes the hardest work you'll ever do in your life, but keep going anyway."

Me: Chris Crutcher has obviously been a big inspiration for you. How have his books influenced your writing? Do you teach his books in your classroom? How do students and parents react to novels like his?

BF: Chris Crutcher has influenced me through his commitment to truth-telling, to writing stories in which teens can find themselves, and to his stance against censorship. I do not teach teenagers any more, so, no, I do not teach his books in my classroom. Chris' books are some of the most frequently awarded-- by organizations that recognize the value of his stories-- and also the most banned-- by people who are either afraid of the truth or who want to dictate for all of us what is suitable to read. His site, http://www.chriscrutcher.com, has a lot more info about his battles on behalf of the First Amendment.

Me: Finally, I ask this of every author I interview, because I find the answers so fascinating. How do you write? What routines do you follow? Do you write at a certain time every day or in a certain place? Do you follow an outline or let the story flow on its own?

BF: Courage in Patience was written in the wee hours of the morning. I have been working on Hope in Patience during the daylight hours, particularly over the past summer when I was off from school. I would start in the morning, stop at noon, then keep going until late afternoon. Many days I looked up in surprise to see that hours have passed. Those are great writing days.

No matter what time of day I write, I need a lack of distractions in order to lose myself in the story. I do not have an outline per se. The story flows on its own; I ask myself what happens next. I rewrite a lot, and drink massive quantities of Diet Coke. At times, I listen to music on my iPod-- folk singers and songwriters such as Chuck Pyle, Kate Wolf, Tom Russell, Shawn Colvin. Their music is soothing to me, and something about the songs they write makes my Writing Muse very content.

Me: Thanks so much for chatting with me, Beth.

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Books Read in 2021 (Asterisks denote favorites)

  • 114. Three Hours by Rosamund Lupton (Jul)
  • 113. The House By the Sea by Louise Douglas (Jul)
  • 112. Little Disasters by Sarah Vaughan (Jul)
  • 111. Boston Jane: The Claim by Jennifer L. Holm (Jul)
  • 110. Boston Jane: Wilderness Days by Jennifer L. Holm (Jul)
  • 109. Boston Jane by Jennifer L. Holm* (Jul)
  • 108. The Opposite of Everyone by Joshilyn Jackson (Jul)
  • 107. A Girl From Yamhill by Beverly Cleary (Jul)
  • 106. Open for Murder by Mary Angela (Jul)
  • 105. The Quality of Silence by Rosamund Lupton (Jul)
  • 104. The Girl Beneath the Sea by Andrew Mayne (Jul)
  • 103. The Lion of Mars by Jennifer L. Holm* (Jul)
  • 102. Nothing Short of Wondrous by Regina Scott (Jul)
  • 101. Dear America: Behind the Masks by Susan Patron (Jul)
  • 100. A Distance Too Grand by Regina Scott* (Jul)
  • 99. The Next Ship Home by Heather Webb (Jun)
  • 98. The Disappearing Act by Catherine Steadman (Jun)
  • 97. The Girls in the Stilt House by Kelly Mustain* (Jun)
  • 96. Midnight at the Electric by Jodi Lynn Anderson (Jun)
  • 95. A Solitude of Wolverines by Alice Henderson (Jun)
  • 94. The Nature of the Beast by Louise Penny* (Jun)
  • 93. Anne of the Island by L.M. Montgomery [audio] (Jun)
  • 92. An Unexpected Peril by Deanna Raybourn (Jun)
  • 91. You Belong Here Now by Dianna Rostad (Jun)
  • 90. The Light of Luna Park by Addison Armstrong (Jun)
  • 89. The Distance Between Lost and Found by Kathryn Holmes (Jun)
  • 88. Along a Storied Trail by Ann H. Gabhart (May)
  • 87. The Wilding Sisters by Eve Chase (May)
  • 86. Margot by Jillian Cantor (May)
  • 85. Anne of Avonlea by L.M. Montgomery [audio] (May)
  • 84. A Deadly Fortune by Stacie Murphy (May)
  • 83. She Lies in Wait by Gytha Lodge (May)
  • 82. Lifeboat 12 by Susan Hood (May)
  • 81. Shiver by Allie Reynolds (May)
  • 80. Hems & Homicide by Elizabeth Penney (May)
  • 79. Atomic Habits by James Clear* (May)
  • 78. Dive Smack by Demetra Brodsky (May)
  • 77. Starfish by Lisa Fipps (May)
  • 76. Flower Net by Lisa See (May)
  • 75. Go to My Grave by Catriona McPherson (May)
  • 74. American Baby by Gabrielle Glaser* (May)
  • 73. Luck of the Titanic by Stacey Lee (May)
  • 72. The Wrong Family by Terryn Fisher (May)
  • 71. The Girl in His Shadow by Audrey Blake (May)
  • 70. Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery* [audio] [re-read] (May)
  • 69. Dial A for Aunties by Jesse Q. Sutanto (May)
  • 68. We Are All the Same in the Dark by Julia Heaberlin (Apr)
  • 67. The Glass House by Eve Chase (Apr)
  • 66. All the Children Are Home by Patry Francis (Apr)
  • 65. The Cold Vanish by Jon Billman* (Apr)
  • 64. The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein [audio] (Apr)
  • 63. The Second Life of Mirielle West by Amanda Skenandore (Apr)
  • 62. The Boy From the Woods by Harlan Coben (Apr)
  • 61. Until I Find You by Rea Frey (Apr)
  • 60. The Devil and the Dark Water by Stuart Turton (Apr)
  • 59. Bluebird by Sharon Cameron* (Apr)
  • 58. Premeditated Myrtle by Elizabeth C. Bunce* [audio] (Apr)
  • 57. The Fire Thief by Debra Bokur (Apr)
  • 56. Any Sign of Life by Rae Carson (Apr)
  • 55. The Firekeeper's Daughter by Angeline Boulley (Mar)
  • 54. Killer Kung Pao by Vivien Chien (Mar)
  • 53. Good Girl, Bad Blood by Holly Jackson (Mar)
  • 52. The Captive Kingdom by Jennifer A. Nielsen (Mar)
  • 51. The Shadow Throne by Jennifer A. Nielsen (Mar)
  • 50. The Answer Is... by Alex Trebek* [audio] (Mar)
  • 49. Willa and the Whale by Chad Morris and Shelly Brown (Mar)
  • 48. A Distant Grave by Sarah Stewart Taylor (Mar)
  • 47. The Sanatorium by Sarah Pearse (Mar)
  • 46. The Elephant's Girl by Celesta Rimington (Mar)
  • 45. After Alice Fell by Kim Taylor Blakemore (Mar)
  • 44. A Trail of Lies by Kylie Logan (Mar)
  • 43. The Runaway King by Jennifer A. Nielsen (Mar)
  • 42. The False Prince by Jennifer A. Nielsen [re-read] (Mar)
  • 41. The Dead Season by Tessa Wegert (Mar)
  • 40. The Lost Family by Libby Copeland* (Mar)
  • 39. The Mountains Wild by Sarah Stewart Taylor (Mar)
  • 38. The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman (Mar)
  • 37. The Survivors by Jane Harper (Feb)
  • 36. The Bone Code by Kathy Reichs* (Feb)
  • 35. The Postscript Murders by Elly Griffiths (Feb)
  • 34. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott* [audio] [re-read] (Feb)
  • 33. The Book of Lost Names by Kristin Harmel (Feb)
  • 32. The Missing One by Lucy Atkins (Feb)
  • 31. The Cold Dish by Craig Johnson (Feb)
  • 30. 96 Miles by J.L. Esplin (Feb)
  • 29. The Family by Louise Jensen (Feb)
  • 28. On These Magic Shores by Yamile Saied Méndez (Feb)
  • 27. In the Deep by Loreth Anne White (Feb)
  • 26. Beginners Welcome by Cindy Baldwin (Feb)
  • 25. The Family Ship by Sonja Yoerg (Feb)
  • 24. Shadows of the White City by Jocelyn Green (Feb)
  • 23. Home Before Dark by Riley Sager (Feb)
  • 22. Veiled in Smoke by Jocelyn Green (Jan)
  • 21. Death in the Family by Tessa Wegert (Jan)
  • 20. Such a Quiet Place by Megan Miranda (Jan)
  • 19. Alone by Megan E. Freeman (Jan)
  • 18. A Lady's Guide to Mischief and Mayhem by Manda Collins (Jan)
  • 17. The Stranger Behind You by Carol Goodman (Jan)
  • 16. To Kill a Mocking Girl by Harper Kincaid (Jan)
  • 15. The Nature of Fragile Things by Susan Meissner* (Jan)
  • 14. Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan [audio] (Jan)
  • 13. The Stills by Jess Montgomery (Jan)
  • 12. Dark August by Katie Tallo* (Jan)
  • 11. Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus by Dusti Bowling [audio] (Jan)
  • 10. Toxic Toffee by Amanda Flower (Jan)
  • 9. The Island at the End of Everything by Kiran Millwood Hargrave (Jan)
  • 8. The Lost Girl of Astor Street by Stephanie Morrill* (Jan)
  • 7. Strike Me Down by Mindy Mejia (Jan)
  • 6. Egg Drop Dead by Vivien Chien (Jan)
  • 5. The Length of a String by Elissa Brent Weissman
  • 4. The Caretakers by Eliza Maxwell (Jan)
  • 3. Murder at Marble House by Alyssa Maxwell (Jan)
  • 2. When the Stars Go Dark by Paula McLain (Jan)
  • 1. The Midnight Library by Matt Haig (Jan)