Monday, February 18, 2013

More Proof That Cozies Just Aren't For Me ...

(Image from Barnes & Noble)

(Note:  While this review will not contain spoilers for Easter Bunny Murder by Leslie Meier, it may inadvertently reveal plot surprises from earlier books featuring Lucy Stone.  As always, I recommend reading  books in a series in order.)

Spring in Tinker's Cove, Maine, just wouldn't be Spring without the annual Easter egg hunt at Pine Point.  Owned by Vivian Van Vorst, one of the richest widows in the country, the gleaming oceanfront estate screams luxury and wealth.  Everyone knows the eggs hidden all over VV's lawn are just as likely to contain pricey gift certificates as chocolate candies.  No one in the little tourist town would miss the annual Easter egg hunt, especially not VV, who looks forward to hosting the event every year.  So, when reporter Lucy Stone arrives at Pine Point with her 3-year-old grandson, she—along with many of her neighbors—is stunned to find the gates of Pine Point locked.  She's even more shocked when a giant Easter bunny stumbles across VV's lawn and drops dead just inside the gates.  

The man inside the bunny suit is Van Vorst Duff (nicknamed "Duff"), VV's 46-year-old grandson.  And, while it appears he died of natural causes, Lucy's not so sure.  Something's amiss at Pine Point, she's almost positive.  Then, Van's snooty sister and her husband move into the mansion, claiming VV can no longer care for herself.  When their shyster lawyer appears, expensive items start disappearing from the home.  Lucy's convinced the couple and their hired man are plotting ways to get their hands on the millions VV will leave behind when she dies—an event they seem intent on hurrying along.  Lucy refuses to stand by and watch VV, who's always given generously to community projects and charities, get fleeced out of her fortune.  But, sticking her nose where it doesn't belong is a dangerous pastime, one which is pushing Lucy right into a killer's path ...

I'm not huge on cozy mysteries.  That's common knowledge around here.  In general, I find them predictable, filled with lackluster writing, cliché characters, and far-fetched plot twists.  All of that is true of Easter Bunny Murder, the 20th installment in Leslie Meier's cozy mystery series featuring Lucy Stone.  The story moves along pretty quickly, so it's entertaining as long as you don't expect too much out of it.  Since I"m not big on these kinds of books in the first place, I won't be revisiting this series.  If you, however, are a cozy fan, you might want to give it a try.

P.S.  If you want a chance to win this book as well as others in the series and some chocolate-y Easter treats, click on the widget below and enter BookTrib's fun giveaway:



(Readalikes:  Reminds me of other cozy mystery series, particularly Joanne Fluke's books featuring Hannah Swenson)

Grade:  C

If this were a movie, it would be rated:  PG for mild language (no F-bombs) and violence

To the FTC, with love:  I received a finished copy of Easter Bunny Murder from the generous folks at BookTrib.  Thank you!    

2 comments:

  1. I'm with you about cozies, don't care for them either. I think the last one I read (that I remember anyway) was Raining Cats and Dogs.

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  2. Meier's books are simple cozies. There are a few contemporary cozy writers such as Cleo Coyle and Julie Hyzy that you might like. Coyle is my favorite.

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