2021 Literary Escapes Challenge

- Alabama
- Alaska
- Arizona (1)
- Arkansas
- California (4)
- Colorado (1)
- Connecticut (1)
- Delaware
- Florida
- Georgia
- Hawaii
- Idaho
- Illinois (3)
- Indiana
- Iowa
- Kansas
- Kentucky
- Louisiana
- Maine
- Maryland (1)
- Massachusetts
- Michigan
- Minnesota (1)
- Mississippi
- Missouri
- Montana
- Nebraska (1)
- Nevada (1)
- New Hampshire (1)
- New Jersey
- New Mexico
- New York (3)
- North Carolina (1)
- North Dakota
- Ohio (5)
- Oklahoma
- Oregon
- Pennsylvania (1)
- Rhode Island (1)
- South Carolina (1)
- South Dakota
- Tennessee
- Texas
- Utah (1)
- Vermont (2)
- Virginia (3)
- Washington (1)
- West Virginia
- Wisconsin
- Wyoming (1)
- *Washington, D.C.

International:
Australia (2)
Canada (3)
England (5)
France (1)
Ireland (1)
Switzerland (1)
The Philippines (1)
Wales (1)

My Progress:


21 / 51 states. 41% done!

2021 Historical Fiction Reading Challenge

- About a war other than World War II
- Takes place before 1800
- Set in a country you do not live in Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
- Main character travels on a ship, train, or covered wagon Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
- Set in a decade you don't usually choose to read about
- A major holiday is celebrated
- Takes place in a city or region where you have lived The Island at the End of Everything by Kiran Millwood Hargrave
- Features time travel to the past
- About a historical disaster, natural or otherwise
- With a proper noun in the title Premeditated Myrtle by Elizabeth C. Bunce
- Features a real female hero from the past
- Book that relates somehow to your own family history (the main character emigrates from the same country your ancestors did, the MC participates in a historical event your family member did, about someone you're related to, etc.)
- Written by a BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) author
- Features a main character with a different ethnicity, religion, or culture than your own The Length of a String by Elissa Brent Weissman
- Has an animal on the cover
- A ghost story
- Features a castle or an old house
- Set in South or Central America
- A mystery The Lost Girl of Astor Street by Stephanie Morrill
- Set in the decade that one of your parents was born in
- Concerns an event of historical significance that happened during your lifetime (or your parents' lifetimes if you were born after 2000)
- Features a search for gold or other kinds of treasure
- A person in period clothing on the cover
- Based on a true story
- A main character who is Native American, Alaska Native, or Native Hawaiian

My Progress:


6 / 25 books. 24% done!

2021 Popsugar Reading Challenge

- A book that's published in 2021 The Caretakers by Eliza Maxwell
- An Afrofuturist book
- A book that has a heart, diamond, club, or spade on the cover Dial A for Aunties by Jesse Q. Sutanto
- A book by an author who shares your zodiac sign The Nature of Fragile Things by Susan Meissner
- A dark academia book
- A book with a gem, mineral, or rock in the title Murder at Marble House by Alyssa Maxwell
- A book where the main character works at your current or dream job Along a Storied Trail by Ann H. Gabhart
- A book that has won the Women's Prize for Fiction
- A book with a family tree
- A bestseller from the 1990s
- A book about forgetting
- A book you have seen on someone's bookshelf (in real life, on a Zoom call, in a TV show, etc.) Home Before Dark by Riley Sager
- A locked-room mysteryThe Sanatorium by Sarah Pearse
- A book set in a restaurant Killer Kung Pao by Vivien Chien
- A book with a black-and-white cover Death in the Family by Tessa Wegert
- A book by an Indigenous author
- A book that has the same title as a song
- A book about a subject you are passionate about The Book of Lost Names by Kristin Harmel
- A book that discusses body positivity
- A book found on a Black Lives Matter reading list
- A genre hybrid The Elephant's Girl by Celesta Rimington
- A book set mostly or entirely outdoors Alone by Megan E. Freeman
- A book with something broken on the cover Strike Me Down by Mindy Mejia
- A book by a Muslim American author
- A book that was published anonymously
- A book with an oxymoron in the title Dark August by Katie Tallo
- A book about do-overs or fresh starts The Midnight Library by Matt Haig
- A magical realism book Beginners Welcome by Cindy Baldwin
- A book set in multiple countries In the Deep by Loreth Anne White
- A book set somewhere you'd like to visit in 2021 Toxic Toffee by Amanda Flower
- A book by a blogger, vlogger, YouTube video creator, or other online personality
- A book whose title starts with "Q," "X," or "Z"
- A book featuring three generations (grandparent, parent, child) Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
- A book about a social justice issue
- A book in a different format than what you normally read (audiobooks, ebooks, graphic novels) Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus by Dusti Bowling (audiobook)
- A book that has fewer than 1,000 reviews on Amazon or Goodreads The Length of a String by Elissa Brent Weissman
- A book you think your best friend would likeThe Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman
- A book about art or an artist Veiled in Smoke by Jocelyn Green
- A book everyone seems to have read but you A Lady's Guide to Mischief and Mayhem by Manda Collins
- Your favorite prompt from a past POPSUGAR Reading Challenge When the Stars Go Dark by Paula McLain

ADVANCED:

- The longest book (by pages) on your TBR list
- The shortest book (by pages) on your TBR list
- The book on your TBR list with the prettiest cover Shadows of the White City by Jocelyn Green
- The book on your TBR list with the ugliest cover On These Magic Shores by Yamile Saied Méndez
- The book that's been on your TBR list for the longest amount of time
- A book from your TBR list you meant to read last year but didn't Egg Drop Dead by Vivien Chien
- A book from your TBR list you associate with a favorite person, place, or thing The Answer Is...by Alex Trebek
- A book from your TBR list chosen at random The Island at the End of Everything by Kiran Millwood Hargrave
- A DNF book from your TBR list
- A free book from your TBR list (gifted, borrowed, library) The Lost Girl of Astor Street by Stephanie Morrill

Booklist Queen's 2021 Reading Challenge

1. A Productivity Book
2. Book Becoming Movie in 2021
3. Goodreads Winner in 2020 The Midnight Library by Matt Haig
4. Biography
5. About a Pressing Social Issue
6. A Book About Books To Kill a Mocking Girl by Harper Kincaid
7. Set in the 1920s The Lost Girl of Astor Street by Stephanie Morrill
8. An Author Who Uses Initials Anne of the Island by L.M. Montgomery
9. Poetry
10. A 2020 Bestseller Home Before Dark by Riley Sager
11. Recommended by a Colleague Death in the Family by Tessa Wegert
12. With a Number in the Title 96 Miles by J.L. Esplin
13. Bottom of Your To-Read List
14. Reread a Favorite Book Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
15. Own Voices Story On These Magic Shores by Yamile Saied Méndez
16. Published in the 1800s Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
17. Local Author Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus by Dusti Bowling
18. Longer Than 400 Pages Dark August by Katie Tallo
19. A Book Turned Into a TV Series The Cold Dish by Craig Johnson
20. A Book That Makes You Think The Lost Family by Libby Copeland
21. A WWII Story The Length of a String by Elissa Brent Weissman
22. A Highly Anticipated Book The Caretakers by Eliza Maxwell
23. Eye-Catching Cover The Island at the End of Everything by Kiran Millwood Hargrave
24. A Summer Read A Lady's Guide to Mischief and Mayhem by Manda Collins
25. Coming of Age Story Alone by Megan E. Freeman
26. Bestselling Memoir The Answer Is... by Alex Trebek
27. Book Club Favorite
28. A Book About Friendship Beginners Welcome by Cindy Baldwin
29. An Audiobook Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
30. Set in Australia In the Deep by Loreth Anne White
31. By a Nobel Prize winner
32. About an Immigrant The Nature of Fragile Things by Susan Meissner
33. Time Travel Novel
34. An Author You Love Egg Drop Dead by Vivien Chien
35. Childhood Favorite
36. Classic Read in High School
37. Borrowed from the Library Murder at Marble House by Alyssa Maxwell
38. Nonfiction New York Times Bestseller
39. From an Indie Publisher
40. Fantasy
41. A Sequel The Stills by Jess Montgomery
42. Recommended by a Librarian
43. Psychological Thriller The Missing One by Lucy Atkins
44. Oprah Winfrey Book Club Pick
45. A Book About Technology
46. Title with Three Words Strike Me Down by Mindy Mejia
47. Debut Novel of Famous Author
48. Genre You Don't Usually Read
49. A Book Everyone Is Talking About The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman
50. You Own But Haven't Read The Sanatorium by Sarah Pearse
51. Borrowed from a Friend
52. A 2021 New Release When the Stars Go Dark by Paula McLain

My Progress:


35 / 52 books. 67% done!

Books Read:

1. Murder at Marble House by Alyssa Maxwell (2 toe tags)
2. The Caretakers by Eliza Maxwell (11 toe tags, 1 unknown COD)
3. Egg Drop Dead by Vivien Chien (1 toe tag)
4. Strike Me Down by Mindy Mejia (3 toe tags)
5. The Lost Girl of Astor Street by Stephanie Morrill (4 toe tags)
6. When the Stars Go Dark by Paula McLain (8 toe tags)
7. Toxic Toffee by Amanda Flower (3 toe tags)
8. Dark August by Katie Tallo (14 toe tags)
9. The Stills by Jess Montgomery (7 toe tags)
10. The Nature of Fragile Things by Susan Meissner (6 toe tags)
11. To Kill a Mocking Girl by Harper Kincaid (2 toe tags)
12. A Lady's Guide to Mischief and Mayhem by Manda Collins (8 toe tags, 1 unknown COD)
13. Death in the Family by Tessa Wegert (9 toe tags)
14. Veiled in Smoke by Jocelyn Green (3 toe tags)
15. Home Before Dark by Riley Sager (6 toe tags)
16. In the Deep by Loreth Anne White (2 toe tags)
17. The Family by Louise Jensen (4 toe tags)
18. The Cold Dish by Craig Johnson (5 toe tags)
19. The Missing One by Lucy Atkins (5 toe tags)
20. The Postscript Murders by Elly Griffiths (4 toe tags, 1 unknown COD)
21. The Bone Code by Kathy Reichs (12 toe tags)
22. The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman (10 toe tags)
23. The Mountains Wild by Sarah Stewart Taylor (6 toe tags)
24. Dial A for Aunties by Jesse Q. Sutanto (1 toe tag)
25. The Dead Season by Tessa Wegert (1 toe tag)
26. A Trail of Lies by Kylie Logan (3 toe tags, 1 unknown COD)
27. After Alice Fell by Kim Taylor Blakemore (7 toe tags)
28. The Sanatorium by Sarah Pearse (6 toe tags, 2 unknown COD)
29. A Distant Grave by Sarah Stewart Taylor (10 toe tags)
30. The Stranger Behind You by Carol Goodman (8 toe tags)
31. Such a Quiet Place by Megan Miranda (3 toe tags)
32. Good Girl, Bad Blood by Holly Jackson (9 toe tags)
33. Premeditated Myrtle by Elizabeth C. Bunce (3 toe tags)
34. Killer Kung Pao by Vivien Chien (1 toe tag)

2021 Craving for Cozies Reading Challenge

Books Read:

1. Murder at Marble House by Alyssa Maxwell
2.
The Length of a String by Elissa Brent Weissman
3. The Lost Girl of Astor Street by Stephanie Morrill
4. The Island at the End of Everything by Kiran Millwood Hargrave
5. When the Stars Go Dark by Paula McLain
6. The Stills by Jess Montgomery
7. Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
8. The Nature of Fragile Things by Susan Meissner
9. A Lady's Guide to Mischief and Mayhem by Manda Collins
10. Veiled in Smoke by Jocelyn Green
11. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
12. Shadows of the White City by Jocelyn Green
13. The Family Ship by Sonja Yoerg
14. The Book of Lost Names by Kristin Harmel
15. Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
16. After Alice Fell by Kim Taylor Blakemore
17. Premeditated Myrtle by Elizabeth C. Bunce

Cozies Read:

1. Murder at Marble House by Alyssa Maxwell
2. Egg Drop Dead by Vivien Chien
3. Toxic Toffee by Amanda Flower
4. To Kill a Mocking Girl by Harper Kincaid
5. Killer Kung Pao by Vivien Chien

The 52 Club's 2021 Reading Challenge

1. Set in a school
2. Featuring the legal profession
3. A dual timeline
4. An author that is deceased
5. Published by Penguin When the Stars Go Dark by Paula McLain
6. A character with the same name as a male family member Toxic Toffee by Amanda Flower
7. An author with only 1 published book 96 Miles by J.L. Esplin
8. A book in the 900's of the Dewey Decimal System The Answer Is... by Alex Trebek
9. Set in a Mediterranean country The Book of Lost Names by Kristin Harmel
10. Related to the word "fire" Veiled in Smoke by Jocelyn Green
11. Book with discussion questions inside The Lost Girl of Astor Street by Stephanie Morrill
12. Title starting with the letter "D" Dark August by Katie Tallo
13. Includes an exotic animal The Missing One by Lucy Atkins
14. Written by an author over 65 (when published) The Bone Code by Kathy Reichs
15. A book mentioned in another book Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
16. Set before the 17th Century
17. A character "on the run" Egg Drop Dead by Vivien Chien
18. Author with a 9-letter last name The Postscript Murders by Elly Griffiths
19. Book with a deckled edge
20. Made into a TV series The Cold Dish by Craig Johnson
21. Book by Kristin Hannah
22. A family saga The Family Ship by Sonja Yoerg
23. An ending that surprises you Death in the Family by Tessa Wegert
24. A book you think they should read in schools
25. A book with multiple character POV Strike Me Down by Mindy Mejia
26. An author of color On These Magic Shores by Yamile Saied Méndez
27. First chapter ends on an odd page number To Kill a Mocking Girl by Harper Kincaid
28. Includes a historical event you know little about The Island at the End of Everything by Kiran Millwood Hargrave
29. Featuring the environment
30. Watch out for dragons!
31. Shares a similar title to another book A Lady's Guide to Mischief and Mayhem by Manda Collins
32. A selfish character Murder at Marble House by Alyssa Maxwell
33. Featuring adoption The Length of a String by Elissa Brent Weissman
34. A book you'd rate 5 stars The Lost Family by Libby Copeland
35. Set in a country that starts with the letter "S" The Sanatorium by Sarah Pearse
36. A nameless narrator
37. An educational read
38. Recommended on BookBub
39. An alternate history novel
40. Found via #bookstagram Home Before Dark by Riley Sager
41. An endorsement by a famous author on the cover
42. An epistolary
43. A character with a pet cat The Midnight Library by Matt Haig
44. Includes a garden Premeditated Myrtle by Elizabeth C. Bunce
45. A coming of age novel Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
46. Winner of the National Book Award - any year
47. A character with a disability Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus by Dusti Bowling
48. A cover with a woman who is facing away The Stills by Jess Montgomery
49. A flavour in the title
50. A shoe on the cover Alone by Megan E. Freeman
51. Published in 2021 The Caretakers by Eliza Maxwell
52. Re-do one of the previous 51 categories from this 2021 challenge The Nature of Fragile Things by Susan Meissner (#48 - Woman on Cover Facing Away)

My Progress:


32 / 52 books. 62% done!

Now Listening to:

Now Listening to:
The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend by Katarina Bivald

My Progress:


31 / 50 books. 62% done!

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Bloggers Behaving Badly? (Updated)

So, Springtime lurks right around the corner, which means the beginning of the end of decent weather here in the Arizona desert. While many of you probably shivered your way through yesterday, I was out re-teaching my 6-year-old to ride a bike (the front tire of his "little" bike may or may not have had a fatal encounter with the tire of my minivan, hence the lesson in how to ride a "big" bike) and sweating. Yes, sweating. And when I got out of the spa last night at around 10, I didn't even shiver. It was that warm. *Sigh* Next thing you know, I'm going to start hankering for a dip in the pool.

These little hints of Spring also remind me that it's almost time for the LDS Storymakers Conference again. I had a great time last year, so I signed up for it again this year. Boot Camp (it's really just a critique group, much less intimidating than it sounds) was such a fun experience for me that I'm doing it again. Also, since my friend got a lot of encouraging feedback on her writing last year from entering the First Chapter contest, I decided to do that, too. Which meant I spent a week of January writing the first section of the novel that's been floating around in my head for some time. You may recall that I wrote a chapter of the same story for last year's Boot Camp. I figure a chapter a year is about all I can handle because, as it turns out, crafting a decent fictional story is kind of hard. Okay, really hard. It's almost enough to make me rethink my Simon Cowell approach to book reviewing. Almost.

As I was editing my chapter, visions of bestsellerdom dancing in my head, I happened across a discussion about how book blogging can harm an aspiring author's chances at publishing. Have you all heard about this? I became aware of the issue first from Jordyn over at Ten Cent Notes, who's taking a hiatus from book blogging because she's afraid that writing negative reviews will hurt her chances at publishing her own book. She wrote about her concerns in this post and this one. Some of her worries come from this post by popular urban fantasy author Stacia Kane, who essentially says that yes, dissing authors (not just slamming them, but even just not recommending their books) can come back to bite you in the hiney. Even though my humble little chapter may never grow into an actual book, let alone one worthy of publication, I shuddered over some of the things Kane said. I mean, I've never held back my opinions on books, but I also never realized that authors bothered to read my reviews let alone cared that much about the thoughts of little ole me.

Then, I ran across this post by an Australian author named Sylvia Massara. At the time I read it, the post had over 100 comments by irate book bloggers as well as authors warning Massara not to ruin her own career by whining about negative reviews. Predictably, the comments have since been deleted. Although I am so unimpressed by this woman that I will never, ever read a book by her, her thoughts on book blogging are really quite hysterical. Still, her remarks make it clear that some authors do read blog reviews and absolutely are affected by what we say. Who knew?

(Update) Just yesterday, I read this post by Kristi over at The Story Siren, which she wrote in response to an author criticizing In My Mailbox. If you're a book blogger, you're probably familiar with IMM, in which people "brag" about the books they got in the mail for review, checked out of the library, received as gifts or bought for themselves. Even though I don't participate in it, I love seeing "the loot" other bloggers receive. And I don't agree at all with the author's statement that "those 'in my mailbox'" posts represent everything that's wrong with the whole scene. It's all about status and swag.” Huh? Actually, it's all about celebrating and idolizing authors (not rock stars or celebrities, but writers). I'm not even going to tell you how many books I've read, let alone purchased, just from seeing them mentioned on IMM posts.

Both Massara's and Kristi's posts made me proud of book bloggers, ready to defend my "people" at all costs. Then, I read this post, in which MG/YA author Lindsey Leavitt talks about an incident she observed with a book blogger at ALA. Can you say embarrassing? Yikes! Talk about giving book bloggers a bad name.

So, given this love/hate relationship that some authors apparently have for us bloggers (which is sometimes deserved, many times not), I'm just going to say this: I love getting free books from authors/publishers. I love having contacts in the publishing world who so generously offer me books and/or happily send me books I have requested. I love reading the books, reviewing them, recommending them to friends, donating them, discussing them, analyzing them, studying them, and, occasionally, drooling over them. I love hearing from authors who say a review of mine made them so happy they smiled or laughed or cried or, once, printed it out and stuck it on their refrigerator. Book blogging excites me, I'm not going to lie. Do I sometimes feel entitled to the hottest ARC? Yes, I do. I also work hard to earn these privileges by reading as much as I can as fast as I can and writing reviews that are (hopefully) thoughtful, honest, and as eloquent as I can make them.

Part of that honesty, of course, is telling the world exactly what I think of a book. I've certainly dissed some authors in my time, some of whom I've actually run into later at conferences and signings.* And while it's created some uncomfortable situations, I'm not about to back down from anything I've said. My opinions are just that - opinions. When I review a book, I'm evaluating a product, a product into which people are going to invest both their money and their time. I'm simply letting them know if - in my opinion - that product is worth the trouble. It's not a personal attack, it's a critique of one particular product. My readers count on me to tell it like it is, to give them my honest thoughts on whether or not they should read a certain book. They know it's only my opinion. They can take it, they can leave it. Whatever.

You might, by now, be wondering what is the point of this long-winded post of mine. I'm not sure exactly what I'm trying to say either. I guess it's this: The relationship between us book bloggers and authors/publishers is a fragile one, even more so than I realized. We can't exist without them. While they can exist without us, they'd be foolish to ignore us since we pour our hearts and souls into promoting books and reading. I propose mutual respect, seeing as we're all after the same thing: we all want people to buy and read books. That being said, I don't think book bloggers should stop expressing honest opinions or resort to publishing only glowing reviews. Everybody knows that not every reader is going to love every book and I don't trust anyone who says otherwise. So, never fear, I won't be taking any hiatuses or backing down or deleting negative reviews, even if it might hurt my chances at topping the NYT Bestseller list. You can rest assured that if it ever comes to a choice between book blogging and publishing a novel (Dream on!), I will choose the former because it's what I love. Besides, at a chapter a year, the latter ain't never gonna happen nohow.

14 comments:

  1. Every author puts a lot of time and effort into their book and it's very scary wondering if people will like it who don't actually know you personally. For me it was at least. It's hard to sell books these days and I'd rather have to review that a bad one. Naturally, everyone has different tastes and not everyone feels the same about every book. That is why I always look for something good to say about it, but like you, want to be honest. If we really hate a book so much that we couldn't even bother to finish it, we list it on our dud list on a separate page of our blog and let it go at that.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I consider myself a blogger who reads and sometimes reviews, does that make sense. I'll have to read the links you've given, but oddly enough I find more authors and publishers are noticing book bloggers,taking what we write more seriously. I ask for ARC's sometimes I get them, sometimes not, and I too love to share any books I've given.
    I'm a new follower, and I look forward to your reviews.

    ReplyDelete
  3. My daughter just pointed to your picture and said, "Barbie!" Don't you feel special?

    I hated that first chapter contest last year and swore never to enter again. I got glowing reviews from four judges, and a scathing one from the fifth. I swear it was a man who doesn't like YA, LDS, message driven romance. I guess judges are just like book bloggers, huh? You can't please them all. :-)

    Anyway, I almost entered this year though I'd said I wouldn't. But in the end I wasn't ready.

    Hope I get to meet the other Susan at Storymakers. And good luck in the contest. Maybe I'll be clapping hard when they call your name. We can always dream.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Karen - I know authors consider their books their "babies," and are as protective about them as they are their actual children, but when I review, I'm only looking at an object, a product, something that has no heart or feelings to hurt. You know? It's never, ever a personal attack.

    Oh, I like the idea of a dud list.

    Anita - That does make sense! I've peeked at your blog and really enjoyed it.

    I think authors are noticing us more and more, which is only right considering how much we do to spread the word about great books. And, I have to say, the majority of writers I've dealt with have been wonderful.

    Susan - LOL. Bless your baby :) I look nothing like Barbie, unless there happens to be an overweight, overtired, overfrazzled housewife version!

    I'm sorry you had a bad experience with the contest. I'm sure I won't win, but I wanted to see what strangers had to say about my writing. My critique partner is wonderful, but probably a TAD biased :)

    Let's definitely meet up at Storymakers. I'd love to chat with my "twin" in person!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Well...I'm not a book blogger, or an author. But I can't tell you how many books I have added to my reading list just from reading your blog! I think book bloggers are a valuable asset to authors and readers alike!
    I love your straightforward, honest reviews.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I'm still trying to see if I can make it to Storymakers this year. I just landed an agent this past week, (SQUEE!!) and I've been dying to go to a great writers conference ever since I started writing three years ago. I need one more than ever now! Maybe I'll see you there! :D
    As for reviews, I love yours. Keep them coming. I've slacked on my book review blog since I've been writing so much, and can't decide whether to keep my writers blog and delete my book blog or not. Too many decisions...

    ReplyDelete
  7. Let me know if you or Robin need somewhere to stay during your conference...I'm impressed that you have managed to write an entire chapter...I can barely string together a paragraph.

    ReplyDelete
  8. A big amen to what Valerie just said.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Ooh, I hope someday you get that book published - I'd totally want to read it. And yeah for people who aren't afraid of expressing negative opinions! I like your negatives as much as your positives.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Wow. Thanks for this amazing post. I love how your broke down and shared everything you'd come across.

    I agree with you.

    Sounds like while writers need to be less sensitive and bloggers need to be more sensitive.

    ReplyDelete
  11. To clarify, writers should be less sensitive about reviews (when they get negative ones) and bloggers need to be more sensitive (to writers feelings). Great post.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I personally think that book bloggers are ROCK STARS! As an author and a book publicist, bloggers are the lifeblood of the industry right now. In an industry where huge publishing powerhouses are crumbling and book review pages in newspapers and mags are shrinking, bloggers are the ones who are supporting and helping the book industry flourish. You guys make reading cool and are spreading the word about great books. Please keep it up! Don't let a few bitter people get you down. Authors LOVE book bloggers! (at least this author does!) xoxo
    Megan

    ReplyDelete
  13. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  14. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete

Comments make me feel special, so go crazy! Just keep it clean and civil. Feel free to speak your mind (I always do), but be aware that I will delete any offensive comments.

P.S.: Don't panic if your comment doesn't show up right away. I have to approve each one before it posts to prevent spam. It's annoying, but it works!

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Books Read in 2021 (Asterisks denote favorites)

  • 114. Three Hours by Rosamund Lupton (Jul)
  • 113. The House By the Sea by Louise Douglas (Jul)
  • 112. Little Disasters by Sarah Vaughan (Jul)
  • 111. Boston Jane: The Claim by Jennifer L. Holm (Jul)
  • 110. Boston Jane: Wilderness Days by Jennifer L. Holm (Jul)
  • 109. Boston Jane by Jennifer L. Holm* (Jul)
  • 108. The Opposite of Everyone by Joshilyn Jackson (Jul)
  • 107. A Girl From Yamhill by Beverly Cleary (Jul)
  • 106. Open for Murder by Mary Angela (Jul)
  • 105. The Quality of Silence by Rosamund Lupton (Jul)
  • 104. The Girl Beneath the Sea by Andrew Mayne (Jul)
  • 103. The Lion of Mars by Jennifer L. Holm* (Jul)
  • 102. Nothing Short of Wondrous by Regina Scott (Jul)
  • 101. Dear America: Behind the Masks by Susan Patron (Jul)
  • 100. A Distance Too Grand by Regina Scott* (Jul)
  • 99. The Next Ship Home by Heather Webb (Jun)
  • 98. The Disappearing Act by Catherine Steadman (Jun)
  • 97. The Girls in the Stilt House by Kelly Mustain* (Jun)
  • 96. Midnight at the Electric by Jodi Lynn Anderson (Jun)
  • 95. A Solitude of Wolverines by Alice Henderson (Jun)
  • 94. The Nature of the Beast by Louise Penny* (Jun)
  • 93. Anne of the Island by L.M. Montgomery [audio] (Jun)
  • 92. An Unexpected Peril by Deanna Raybourn (Jun)
  • 91. You Belong Here Now by Dianna Rostad (Jun)
  • 90. The Light of Luna Park by Addison Armstrong (Jun)
  • 89. The Distance Between Lost and Found by Kathryn Holmes (Jun)
  • 88. Along a Storied Trail by Ann H. Gabhart (May)
  • 87. The Wilding Sisters by Eve Chase (May)
  • 86. Margot by Jillian Cantor (May)
  • 85. Anne of Avonlea by L.M. Montgomery [audio] (May)
  • 84. A Deadly Fortune by Stacie Murphy (May)
  • 83. She Lies in Wait by Gytha Lodge (May)
  • 82. Lifeboat 12 by Susan Hood (May)
  • 81. Shiver by Allie Reynolds (May)
  • 80. Hems & Homicide by Elizabeth Penney (May)
  • 79. Atomic Habits by James Clear* (May)
  • 78. Dive Smack by Demetra Brodsky (May)
  • 77. Starfish by Lisa Fipps (May)
  • 76. Flower Net by Lisa See (May)
  • 75. Go to My Grave by Catriona McPherson (May)
  • 74. American Baby by Gabrielle Glaser* (May)
  • 73. Luck of the Titanic by Stacey Lee (May)
  • 72. The Wrong Family by Terryn Fisher (May)
  • 71. The Girl in His Shadow by Audrey Blake (May)
  • 70. Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery* [audio] [re-read] (May)
  • 69. Dial A for Aunties by Jesse Q. Sutanto (May)
  • 68. We Are All the Same in the Dark by Julia Heaberlin (Apr)
  • 67. The Glass House by Eve Chase (Apr)
  • 66. All the Children Are Home by Patry Francis (Apr)
  • 65. The Cold Vanish by Jon Billman* (Apr)
  • 64. The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein [audio] (Apr)
  • 63. The Second Life of Mirielle West by Amanda Skenandore (Apr)
  • 62. The Boy From the Woods by Harlan Coben (Apr)
  • 61. Until I Find You by Rea Frey (Apr)
  • 60. The Devil and the Dark Water by Stuart Turton (Apr)
  • 59. Bluebird by Sharon Cameron* (Apr)
  • 58. Premeditated Myrtle by Elizabeth C. Bunce* [audio] (Apr)
  • 57. The Fire Thief by Debra Bokur (Apr)
  • 56. Any Sign of Life by Rae Carson (Apr)
  • 55. The Firekeeper's Daughter by Angeline Boulley (Mar)
  • 54. Killer Kung Pao by Vivien Chien (Mar)
  • 53. Good Girl, Bad Blood by Holly Jackson (Mar)
  • 52. The Captive Kingdom by Jennifer A. Nielsen (Mar)
  • 51. The Shadow Throne by Jennifer A. Nielsen (Mar)
  • 50. The Answer Is... by Alex Trebek* [audio] (Mar)
  • 49. Willa and the Whale by Chad Morris and Shelly Brown (Mar)
  • 48. A Distant Grave by Sarah Stewart Taylor (Mar)
  • 47. The Sanatorium by Sarah Pearse (Mar)
  • 46. The Elephant's Girl by Celesta Rimington (Mar)
  • 45. After Alice Fell by Kim Taylor Blakemore (Mar)
  • 44. A Trail of Lies by Kylie Logan (Mar)
  • 43. The Runaway King by Jennifer A. Nielsen (Mar)
  • 42. The False Prince by Jennifer A. Nielsen [re-read] (Mar)
  • 41. The Dead Season by Tessa Wegert (Mar)
  • 40. The Lost Family by Libby Copeland* (Mar)
  • 39. The Mountains Wild by Sarah Stewart Taylor (Mar)
  • 38. The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman (Mar)
  • 37. The Survivors by Jane Harper (Feb)
  • 36. The Bone Code by Kathy Reichs* (Feb)
  • 35. The Postscript Murders by Elly Griffiths (Feb)
  • 34. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott* [audio] [re-read] (Feb)
  • 33. The Book of Lost Names by Kristin Harmel (Feb)
  • 32. The Missing One by Lucy Atkins (Feb)
  • 31. The Cold Dish by Craig Johnson (Feb)
  • 30. 96 Miles by J.L. Esplin (Feb)
  • 29. The Family by Louise Jensen (Feb)
  • 28. On These Magic Shores by Yamile Saied Méndez (Feb)
  • 27. In the Deep by Loreth Anne White (Feb)
  • 26. Beginners Welcome by Cindy Baldwin (Feb)
  • 25. The Family Ship by Sonja Yoerg (Feb)
  • 24. Shadows of the White City by Jocelyn Green (Feb)
  • 23. Home Before Dark by Riley Sager (Feb)
  • 22. Veiled in Smoke by Jocelyn Green (Jan)
  • 21. Death in the Family by Tessa Wegert (Jan)
  • 20. Such a Quiet Place by Megan Miranda (Jan)
  • 19. Alone by Megan E. Freeman (Jan)
  • 18. A Lady's Guide to Mischief and Mayhem by Manda Collins (Jan)
  • 17. The Stranger Behind You by Carol Goodman (Jan)
  • 16. To Kill a Mocking Girl by Harper Kincaid (Jan)
  • 15. The Nature of Fragile Things by Susan Meissner* (Jan)
  • 14. Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan [audio] (Jan)
  • 13. The Stills by Jess Montgomery (Jan)
  • 12. Dark August by Katie Tallo* (Jan)
  • 11. Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus by Dusti Bowling [audio] (Jan)
  • 10. Toxic Toffee by Amanda Flower (Jan)
  • 9. The Island at the End of Everything by Kiran Millwood Hargrave (Jan)
  • 8. The Lost Girl of Astor Street by Stephanie Morrill* (Jan)
  • 7. Strike Me Down by Mindy Mejia (Jan)
  • 6. Egg Drop Dead by Vivien Chien (Jan)
  • 5. The Length of a String by Elissa Brent Weissman
  • 4. The Caretakers by Eliza Maxwell (Jan)
  • 3. Murder at Marble House by Alyssa Maxwell (Jan)
  • 2. When the Stars Go Dark by Paula McLain (Jan)
  • 1. The Midnight Library by Matt Haig (Jan)